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What is Synology Backup Rotation? (Answered!)

In this blog post, I will be discussing what Synology Backup Rotation is and how it works.

The topic of this article talks about something specific in their product, so if you don’t know anything about any type of backup software or are thinking about buying one for your business then read on!

What is Synology Backup Rotation?

Synology Backup Rotation is a backup method where data is backed up in incremental mode. This means that only the changes made to files since the last backup are stored, making the process quicker and more efficient.

For larger organizations with lots of data to store, using Synology Hyper Backup can be a great way to ensure all of that data is safely backed up. It provides an intuitive and complete backup and restore solution to help you keep your data by backing it up to local shared folders, external devices, or other Synology NASes.

It also supports backing up with rsync servers or cloud services like Google Drive, Amazon Drive, and Microsoft Azure.

How to set up Synology Backup Rotation?

Synology backup rotation is the process of creating and maintaining multiple backups, usually on different storage devices, so that if one fails or becomes corrupted, you have others to fall back on.

The most common type of backup rotation is the 3-2-1 rule, which recommends having three copies of your data (the original and two backups) on two different media (such as an external hard drive and a cloud storage service), with one of those copies stored off-site (such as in a safety deposit box or at a friend’s house).

While the 3-2-1 rule is a good starting point, you may want to tailor your backup rotation strategy to better suit your needs. For example, if you have a large amount of data and can’t easily store three copies of it off-site, you may want to consider using a cloud backup service that stores multiple copies of your data in different locations automatically. Or, if you’re backing up critical business data, you may want to create additional backups more often than once per day.

No matter what type of backup rotation strategy you choose, the most important thing is to ensure that you have multiple backups and that they are stored in different locations to protect against data loss.

  1. Log in to your Synology account and go to the Control Panel.
  2. Click on “External Devices” and then select “USB Backup”.
  3. Click on “Enable Rotation” and then select the number of backups you want to keep.
  4. Click on “Apply” and then reboot your Synology device.

Your Synology device will now rotate backups automatically. This can be useful if you want to keep multiple backups and don’t want to delete the older ones manually.

How to use Synology Backup Rotation?

  1. Log in to your Synology account and go to the Control Panel.
  2. Click on “External Devices” and then select “USB Backup”.
  3. Connect your USB drive to the Synology device.
  4. Click on “Backup Now” and your backups will start rotating.

Synology backup rotation is a great way to keep your backups up to date and safe. By rotating your backups, you can ensure that you always have a recent backup in case something happens to your primary backup. This is especially important if you are backing up critical data.

What are the pros of Synology Backup Rotation?

There are several benefits to using Synology backup rotation, including:

It ensures you always have a recent backup

By rotating your backups, you can be sure that you always have a backup that is relatively up to date. This is important in case something happens to your primary backup, as you will still have a copy of your data that is relatively recent.

Saves storage space

When you have multiple backups, you can delete older backups that you no longer need, which frees up storage space.

It reduces wear and tear on devices

If you are backing up to an external hard drive, rotating your backups can reduce wear and tear on the drive, as it will not be used as often.

Prevents data loss

If you only have one backup and something happens to it, you could lose all of your data. However, if you have multiple backups, you can restore your data from another backup if one becomes damaged or lost.

It’s easy to set up and use

Synology backup rotation is easy to set up and use, so you can start using it right away to protect your data.

What are the cons of Synology Backup Rotations?

There are a few potential disadvantages to using Synology backup rotation, including:

It requires extra storage space

To rotate your backups, you will need to have enough storage space to store multiple copies of your data. This can be expensive if you have a large amount of data to back up.

It takes up extra time

Rotating your backups will take up more of your time than if you only had one backup. This is because you will need to create and manage multiple backups.

It can be complex

Synology backup rotation can be complex to set up and manage, especially if you have a lot of data to back up. This can make it difficult to use for some people.

It requires extra effort to rotate your backups

You will need to put in extra effort to create and manage them. This can be a hassle for some people.

It may not be necessary

If you only have a small amount of data to back up, you may not need to rotate your backups. This is because you can easily fit all of your data into one backup.

Synology backup rotation is a great way to keep your backups up-to-date and safe. However, it requires extra storage space, time, and effort to set up and manage. Additionally, it may not be necessary for everyone. But, if you have a lot of data to back up, Synology backup rotation can be a great way to protect your data.

What are the best practices for using Synology Backup Rotation?

There are a few best practices that should be followed when using the Synology Backup Rotation tool.

First, it is important to create an inventory of all files that need to be backed up. This will help ensure that nothing important is missed during the backup process.

Second, it is wise to create different schedules for backing up different types of data. For example, archives can be backed up less frequently than files that are actively being used.

Third, backups should always be tested and verified after they have been created. This helps ensure that the data is actually successfully backed up and can be used in the event of a disaster.

Finally, it is important to keep track of the latest version of the backup software so that updates can be installed as needed.

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